Condensed Matter Seminars

Hydrogen bonds and two dimensional materials investigated using noncontact atomic force microscopy

Speaker: 
Bingkai Yuan, China Academy of Engineering Physics
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2015-08-05 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

Orbital Angular Momentum and Spectral Flow in Two Dimensional Chiral Superfluids

Speaker: 
Masaki Oshikawa, Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-08-06 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Ian Affleck
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The orbital angular momentum in a chiral superfluid has posed a paradox for several decades.

Super-resolution in time and space: exploring the nano-world faster than a cycle of light

Speaker: 
Tyler Cocker, University of Regensburg
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2015-07-22 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Scanning probe microscopies such as atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy provide access to the details of material surfaces with unsurpassed spatial resolution. By coupling light to these probes, one can even image optical properties in nanostructures far smaller than the free space wavelength.

Pairing symmetry in KFe2As2, RbFe2As2, and CsFe2As2

Speaker: 
Fazel Fallah Tafti, Princeton University
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2015-06-08 11:00 - 12:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The discovery of iron-based superconductors sparked a tremendous amount of excitement in finding a new family of high Tc superconductors next to cuprates. A well-established result is that the pairing symmetry of iron-based superconductors is s-wave, setting them apart from the d-wave cuprates. An intriguing question remains as to whether d-wave can ever become a dominant pairing channel in iron-based superconductors.

Attosecond Photoemission Spectroscopy on Surfaces and Interfaces

Speaker: 
Johann Riemensberger, Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-04-23 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The confinement of an excitation or interrogation pulse below one femtosecond now allows the direct observation of electronic motion in atoms and even solids on the atomic scales of time and length. One most fundamental effect of light-matter interaction is photoemission. Attosecond streaking spectroscopy allows to measure the relative time the arrival of photoexcited electrons at the solid-vacuum interface with precision on the 10 as level.

Continuous preparation of a fractional Chern insulator

Speaker: 
Chris Laumann, Department of Physics, University of Washington
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-04-16 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Marcel Franz/Armin Rahmani
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Fractional Chern insulators (FCI) are lattice-dominated realizations of conventional fractional quantum Hall states. For example, possible microscopic realizations of FCIs have been proposed in ultracold atomic gases and polar molecules. Unlike typical condensed matter systems, such quantum optical realizations are driven, non-equilibrium implementations. Thus, one cannot simply ‘cool’ into the FCI state by decreasing the temperature of a surrounding bath.

Supramolecular Origami: Transforming Paper into Twisted Photonic Structures

Speaker: 
Mark MacLachlan, Department of Chemistry UBC
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-04-09 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

Special seminar: Energy in molecular machines

Speaker: 
M.A. Van Hove, Institute of Computational and Theoretical Studies & Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2015-04-10 10:00 - 11:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Local Contact: 
Keith Mitchell (Chemistry)
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

Molecular machines are gaining increasing interest from biological to energetic perspectives.  They promise to convert energy and control mechanical motion at length scales down to the nanometer.  Some molecular machines cause reciprocal motion, as in muscles and switches, while others cause rotational motion, as in flagellae:  we discuss theoretical models of both.

Frustrated magnetism, magnetization plateaux, and the mystery of SrCu2(BO3)2

Speaker: 
F. Mila, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-03-26 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Ian Affleck
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Frustration is at the origin of many strange properties in quantum magnets. It dramatically enhances quantum fluctuations, often preventing systems from developing long-range magnetic order.  This opens the way to original alternatives such as algebraic or gapped spin liquids. Even the way a system polarizes in an external field is qualitatively modified by frustration, which often induces strange anomalies such as magnetization jumps or magnetization plateaux.

Physics and Chemistry at the Single-Molecule Level

Speaker: 
Latha Venkataraman, Department of Applied Physics and Department of Chemistry, Columbia University
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-03-19 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

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