Astronomy Colloquia

Galaxy Fertility: Nature vs. Nurture

Speaker: 
Gary Mamon (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-01-12 12:30 - 14:00
Location: 
Hennings 301 - NOTE DIFFERENT ROOM
Local Contact: 
Ludo van Waerbeke and Jaymie Matthews
Galaxies grow by gas infall and mergers, but their growth is constrained by mechanisms that limit the supply of gas to the molecular clouds where stars are observed to form. These mechanisms can be internal feedback processes from supernova explosions and outflows from active galactic nuclei around the central supermassive black hole. But the environment of galaxies can also affect the rate of star formation in galaxies, through physical processes such as tidal stripping and ram pressure stripping that starve the galaxy from its gas supply, as well as galaxy encounters.

Measuring the geometry of the Universe with Euclid

Speaker: 
Alina Kiessling (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-01-16 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
The Euclid mission is a European Space Agency (ESA) led space telescope with significant contributions from NASA (and now Canada!). Euclid will use two complementary probes to study the dark sector of the Universe. The concordance model of cosmology holds that 95% percent of the Universe is made up of dark matter and dark energy, yet we understand very little about these phenomena.

THIS WEEK'S ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIUM WILL BE ON THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Speaker: 
Check the entry on 9 December for details
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-12-05 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
None today

The enigma of Fast Radio Bursts

Speaker: 
Paul Scholz (Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Fellow)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2016-12-07 15:00 - 16:15
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Ingrid Stairs and Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

A new phenomenon has emerged in time-domain astronomy in the past few years: the Fast Radio Burst. Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio bursts whose dispersion measures imply that they originate from far outside of the Galaxy. Their origin is as yet unknown; their durations and energetics imply that they involve compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes. Due to the extreme luminosities implied by their distances and the previous absence of any repeat burst in follow-up observations, many potential explanations for FRBs involve one-time cataclysmic events.

The Universe of soils

Speaker: 
Phil Gregory (UBC Physics & Astronomy
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-02-06 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Our originally scheduled speaker, Dr. Sandstrom has contracted pneumonia and will be unable to visit us.

Tracking Planet Footprints in Dusty Disks

Speaker: 
Catherine Espaillat (Boston University)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-03-13 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
We know that most stars were once surrounded by protoplanetary disks. How these young disks evolve into planetary systems is a fundamental question in astronomy. Observations of T Tauri stars (TTS) may provide insights, particularly a subset of TTS with “transitional disks” that contain holes or gaps in their dust disk. Many researchers have posited that these holes and gaps are the “footprints” of planets given that theoretical simulations predict that a young, forming planet will clear the material around itself, leaving behind a cavity in the disk.

*** CANCELLED *** Multiphase Gas Flows in Gaseous Galaxy Halos

Speaker: 
Jessica Werk (University of Washington)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-03-20 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
UNFORTUNATELY, DR. WERK WON'T BE ABLE TO JOIN US. WE ARE RESCHEDULING HER PRESENTATION FOR THE FALL.

Under the light of a red sun: Prospects for life on Proxima b

Speaker: 
Jaymie Matthews (UBC Physics & Astronomy)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-10-17 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
A minimum-Earth=mass planet, dubbed Proxima b, was recently discovered in the Habitable Zone of the next nearest star after the Sun, Proxima Centauri a. The detection was made through radial velocity measurements, but the MOST space telescope was also used to search for transits and assess the flare and spot activity of the M5.5V star. Could Proxima b support life? What are the pros and cons for habitability of planets around M dwarf stars?

UBC READING WEEK BEGINS

Speaker: 
NO ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIUM TODAY
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-02-20 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Nowhere

BC FAMILY DAY HOLIDAY

Speaker: 
NO ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIUM TODAY
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-02-13 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Nowhere
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