Astronomy Colloquia

*** CANCELLED *** Multiphase Gas Flows in Gaseous Galaxy Halos

Speaker: 
Jessica Werk (University of Washington)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-03-20 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
UNFORTUNATELY, DR. WERK WON'T BE ABLE TO JOIN US. WE ARE RESCHEDULING HER PRESENTATION FOR THE FALL.

Under the light of a red sun: Prospects for life on Proxima b

Speaker: 
Jaymie Matthews (UBC Physics & Astronomy)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-10-17 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
A minimum-Earth=mass planet, dubbed Proxima b, was recently discovered in the Habitable Zone of the next nearest star after the Sun, Proxima Centauri a. The detection was made through radial velocity measurements, but the MOST space telescope was also used to search for transits and assess the flare and spot activity of the M5.5V star. Could Proxima b support life? What are the pros and cons for habitability of planets around M dwarf stars?

UBC READING WEEK BEGINS

Speaker: 
NO ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIUM TODAY
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-02-20 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Nowhere

BC FAMILY DAY HOLIDAY

Speaker: 
NO ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIUM TODAY
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-02-13 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Nowhere

Organic matter in the Universe: From Solar System to distant galaxies

Speaker: 
Sun Kwok (University of Hong Kong)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-01-09 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Recent observational and experimental evidence for the presence of complex organics in space is reviewed. Remote astronomical observations have detected ~200 gas-phased molecules through their rotational and vibrational transitions. Many classes of organic molecules are represented in this list, including some precursors to biological molecules. A number of unidentified spectral phenomena observed in the interstellar medium are likely to have originated from complex organics.

ASTRO-JAMBOREE 2016

Speaker: 
All members of the UBC Astronomy Group
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-09-19 15:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate
The Astro-Jamboree is an annual tradition - a chance for everyone in the Astronomy Group (grad students, postdocs, undergrads, staff and faculty) to share and advertise their current research and activities, their progress and any future plans. It gives us a chance to start the academic term having a sense of what's happening (and will be happening) in our group, and to enhance research & education collaborations. The presentations will be short (1 - 2 min), illustrated by a few slides.

Observing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks

Speaker: 
Sean Andrews - Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-10-24 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews and Aaron Boley
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The canonical model for the formation of terrestrial planets and giant planet cores relies on an early and very efficient phase of planetesimal growth in a gas-rich circumstellar disk. But, as theorists have known for decades now, there are some formidable obstacles to meeting that requirement. Many of these problems, and potentially their solutions, are associated with the growth and migration of "pebbles" (mm/cm-sized particles) in the first few million years of a disk's lifetime.

How Dynamical Chaos Shapes the Architectures of Planetary Systems

Speaker: 
Dan Tamayo (CITA and University of Toronto Centre for Planetary Sciences)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-11-07 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Aaron Boley and Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
The Solar System exists in a state of marginal stability. Is this an expected outcome? The exoplanet sample is now large enough that we can start to meaningfully address this question. I will present recent work connecting what are possibly the first observations of a planetary system forming within its birth disk to several observed features in the exoplanet sample.

RESCHEDULED TO MONDAY

Speaker: 
Gwendolyn Eadie (McMaster University)
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2016-09-09 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
_
Local Contact: 
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Frontiers in Massive Stellar Death

Speaker: 
Sean Couch (Michigan State University)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2017-03-06 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Core-collapse supernovae are the luminous explosions that herald the death of massive stars. While core-collapse supernovae are observed on a daily basis in nature, the details of the mechanism that reverses stellar collapse and drives these explosions remain unclear. While the most recent high-fidelity simulations show promise at explaining the explosion mechanism, there remains tension between theory and observation. I will discuss the recent developments in the study of the supernova mechanism that could lead to a predictive theory of massive stellar death.
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