States built on the 9/2(+) isomers in Y-91,Y-93

TitleStates built on the 9/2(+) isomers in Y-91,Y-93
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsFotiades, N., J. A. Cizewski, R. Krucken, R. M. Clark, P. Fallon, I. Y. Lee, A. O. Macchiavelli, and W. Younes
JournalEuropean Physical Journal A
Volume48
Issue9
Date PublishedSep
ISBN Number1434-6001
Accession NumberWOS:000309858600014
AbstractThe isotopes Y-91,Y-93 are located close to Zr-90, a nucleus that has a neutron shell closure (N = 50) and a proton subshell closure (Z = 40), and close to the stability line. However, relatively little is known about excitations above their 9/2(+) isomers. In the present work the isotopes Y-91,Y-93 have been studied in the fission of compound systems formed in two heavy-ion-induced reactions using the Gammasphere array for gamma-ray spectroscopy. States with excitation energies up to 6.9 and 7.1MeV above the previously known 9/2(+) isomers of Y-91,Y-93 were established, respectively. The coupling of a proton-hole occupying the g(9/2) orbital to the yrast states in the core nuclei of Sr-90 and Zr-92 can account for the first excited states of Y-91. A comparison with the first excited states in the neighboring N = 52, 54 isotopes is also considered. The experimental results are compared to predictions from previously reported shell-model calculations. The present results enhance previous knowledge on Y-91,Y-93 from fusion-evaporation reactions and multinucleon transfer reactions, and highlight the roles of these complementary reactions in probing moderate spin excitations in this mass region.
URL<Go to ISI>://WOS:000309858600014
DOI10.1140/epja/i2012-12117-3
Short TitleStates built on the 9/2(+) isomers in Y-91,Y-93
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