TRIUMF Talks

Muonic atoms and proton radius puzzle

Speaker: 
Chen Ji (TRIUMF)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-10-30 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Muonic atoms and proton radius puzzle

Exploring isospin asymmetry and independence along the N=Z line

Speaker: 
Silvia Lenzi (INFN and U Padova)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-10-23 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Exploring isospin asymmetry and independence along the N=Z line

Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging

Speaker: 
Ann-Marie Chacko
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-10-02 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Local Contact: 
Paul Schaeffer
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging

Precision physics with few electron atoms and molecules

Speaker: 
Krzysztof Pachucki (U Warsaw)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-09-25 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Local Contact: 
Sonia Bacca
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Precision physics with few electron atoms and molecules

Turbulent nuclear burning and the exotic formation of heavy elements in stars

Speaker: 
Falk Herwig (U Victoria)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-06-12 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Turbulent nuclear burning and the exotic formation of heavy elements in stars

In Search of Double Beta-Decay

Speaker: 
Kai Zuber (TU Dresden)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-06-05 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

In Search of Double Beta-Decay

Recent Results on Shape Coexistence in Nuclei

Speaker: 
Wolfram Korten (CEA Saclay)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-05-22 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Recent Results on Shape Coexistence in Nuclei

The Decade of the WIMP

Speaker: 
Edward "Rocky" Kolb (U Chicago)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2014-05-07 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

The Decade of the WIMP

The bulk of the matter in the present universe is dark. The most attractive possibility for the nature of the dark matter is a new species of elementary particle known as a WIMP (a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle). After a discussion of how a WIMP might fit into models of particle physics, I will review the current situation with respect to direct detection, indirect detection, and collider production of WIMPs. Rapid advances in the field should enable us to answer by the end of the decade whether our universe is dominated by WIMPs.

Recent Results on Shape Coexistence in Nuclei

Speaker: 
Wolfram Korten (CEA Saclay)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-04-17 14:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

The shape of atomic nuclei often deviates from a spherical mass distribution as soon as we leave arrangements with closed proton and neutron shells. The most common deviation from sphericity is the quadrupole deformation, i.e. elongated or compressed elipsoidal shapes, but higher order deviations exist as well. The development of nuclear deformation is intimately linked to the erosion of the (spherical) shell structure characterised by the so-called "magic numbers” of the nuclear shell model.

The Origin of the Elements and the Critical Role of Binary Stars

Speaker: 
Robert Izzard (U. Bonn)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2014-04-02 14:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Local Contact: 
David Morrissey (dmorri@triumf.ca)

In a few millenia of recorded history, mankind has made great strides in its understanding of the Universe. We now know that the Big Bang created almost all visible matter as just two elements, hydrogen and helium, which were later turned into carbon, oxygen, iron and the 90+ other chemical elements by nucleosynthesis in stars. Many of these stars are gravitationally bound as close binary systems which may evolve quite differently to single stars leading to exotic phenomena such as thermonuclear novae and gamma-ray bursts.

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