Graduate Students Seminars

A physicist in disguise: predicting loan defaults

Speaker: 
Fernando Nogueira
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-03-20 12:00 - 13:00
Location: 
Henn 318
Local Contact: 
Hal Clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

In this talk I will describe a remarkably fun project I recently embarked on - learning machine learning. This ongoing quest taught me many interesting things about a field of computer science called "machine learning", and ultimately led me to kaggle.com, where I just finished my first competition.

Getting students to reflect in the lab

Speaker: 
Natasha Holmes
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2014-02-07 12:00 - 13:00
Location: 
Henn 309
Local Contact: 
Hal Clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Recent data from one of our first year physics labs has shown evidence that students are not applying scientific thinking as they perform experiments. Why might this be? Well, we hadn't really taught them how to think scientifically about their results and they lacked some important skills for effectively reflecting about their data. They rarely had enough time to pause and re-evaluate what they'd been doing and we also weren't giving them much support or rewards for doing it.

Physically Meaningful or Mathematically Pedantic?

Speaker: 
Connor Behan
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2013-11-29 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henn 301 (NOT the usual room!)
Local Contact: 
Hal Clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

There is so much physics and so little time. In papers that solve a boundary-value problem, there is usually no proof that the solution is unique. Sometimes it is found by taking a limit inside an integral or computing a sum without worrying about whether it converges uniformly. If one stops to pay attention to these mathematical subtleties, does this shed new light on the physical problem? Sometimes. We will go through some example problems where extra rigour is possible and try to figure out when it is needed.

Interactions between teaching assistants and students boost engagement in physics labs

Speaker: 
Jared Stang
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2013-11-01 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henn 318
Local Contact: 
hal clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Through in-class observations of teaching assistants (TAs) and students in the lab sections of a large introductory physics course, we study which TA behaviors can be used to predict student engagement and learning. For the TAs, we record data to determine how they adhere to and deliver the lesson plan and how they interact with students during the lab. For the students, we use observations to record the level of student engagement and pre- and post-tests of lab skills to measure learning.

A Comprehensive Study of Relativistic Gravity using PSR B1534+12

Speaker: 
Emmanuel Fonseca
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2013-07-26 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henn 318
Local Contact: 
hal clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Pulsars have been repeatedly shown to be versatile tools for understanding problems in fundamental physics. In particular, pulsars in relativistic binary systems have provided the most rigorous tests of gravitational theory in strong fields to date. High-precision timing of such an object produces a timing model that describes 'post-Keplerian' effects that characterize relativistic corrections to the standard Keplerian orbit, as well as its nominal spin, astrometric and environmental properties.

Disentangling the in- and out-of-plane components of the microwave surface resistance in Tl-2201

Speaker: 
Mahyad Aghigh
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2013-03-13 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henn 318
Local Contact: 
hal clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Investigation of Tl2Ba2Cu1Ox (Tl-2201) properties is important as it provides access to the overdoped side of the superconducting dome. We are measuring the surface resistance of Tl-2201, Rs(ω,T), using a bolometric technique well established by our group. Experimentally separating the in- and out-of-plane components of Rs for Tl-2201, however, is challenging due to demagnetization effects. To account for this complication, we are measuring Rs of an isotropic replica sample of NbZr in two specific orientations where the field is parallel and perpendicular to the crystal plane.

Characterizing T2 Distributions in Human Brain using MRI 2

Speaker: 
Bretta Russell-Schulz
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-11-30 16:01 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Hal Clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Quantitative T2 measurements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide information about water environments in biological structures. T2 relaxation arises from spin interactions between protons and the rates are dependent on the biological environment; for example, different structures in the brain will give rise to different T2 times. Multiple water environments found in individual structures will result in a distribution of T2 times and this can be used to probe the nature of different structures.

Characterizing T2 Distributions in Human Brain using MRI

Speaker: 
Bretta Russell-Schulz
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-11-30 15:59 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
hal clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Quantitative T2 measurements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide information about water environments in biological structures. T2 relaxation arises from spin interactions between protons and the rates are dependent on the biological environment; for example, different structures in the brain will give rise to different T2 times. Multiple water environments found in individual structures will result in a distribution of T2 times and this can be used to probe the nature of different structures.

The connection between holography and entanglement and other related cool things

Speaker: 
Fernando Nogueira
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-10-26 16:00 - 16:55
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
hal clark
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

In this talk I hope to motivate a connection between two very unintuitive ideas, holography and entanglement. I will start by introducing the idea of holography and its relevance to today's pursuit of a quantum theory of gravity. Latter, I will argue for a close connection between entanglement and the emergence of a holographic dual spacetime (whatever that is). I'll finish by tapping my self on the back showing some stuff that I was involved with, am involved with, and things that interest me. However, I'll try to keep things non technical and focus of the main ideas.

Nonlocal Dielectric Response of Water

Speaker: 
Matthew Badali
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-08-10 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 304 (different room!)
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

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