Department Colloquia

TBD

Speaker: 
David Kaplan (Johns Hopkins)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-12-07 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 201
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

The Accelerating Universe: Lambda, w, and beyond

Speaker: 
Levon Pogosian (SFU)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-10-26 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 201
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

While cosmic acceleration is well-established, the nature of Dark Energy causing it remains unknown. A flat universe dominated by a cosmological constant (Lambda) and cold dark matter (CDM) has been cosmologists’ working model of choice for nearly two decades. However, the value of Lambda poses a serious theoretical challenge, exposing a gap in our understanding of the vacuum energy and the way it gravitates. Intriguingly, there appear to be tensions between different datasets within the LCDM framework that would be relieved if Dark Energy was non-constant.

TBA

Speaker: 
Jame Pinfold (University of Alberta)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-11-23 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 201
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

PhD Comics

Speaker: 
Jorge Cham and Daniel Whiteson
Event Date and Time: 
Sun, 2017-09-17 19:00 - 20:30
Location: 
Hebb Theatre
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Public

Jorge Cham, the creator of “Piled Higher and Deeper”, and his collaborator physicist Daniel Whiteson, will discuss “PhD Comics” and their new book “We Have No Idea, A Guide to the Unknown Universe”.  Come see this entertaining event, which will include live illustrations!

TBD

Speaker: 
Brett Gladman (UBC)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-11-02 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 201
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

The International Race For A Quantum Computer

Speaker: 
Stephanie Simmons (SFU)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-09-14 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 201
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Silicon transistors, the essential building block of most modern electronic devices, cannot shrink much further without being rendered inoperable by quantum mechanics. This classical-quantum threshold in fact presents a tremendous opportunity: if we harness quantum mechanics, rather than attempt to avoid it, we could build a quantum computer. Quantum computers will open up a world of opportunities — they could accomplish certain computational tasks exponentially faster, which would otherwise be forever impractical. During this lecture, Dr.

A Painlessly Effective Version of Active Learning and Why It Works

Speaker: 
Dan Schwartz (Stanford)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-09-21 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 201
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

To be successful, active learning depends on good tasks.  "Inventing" tasks ask students to find and explain patterns in well-structured data.  These tasks create a time for telling, so that students learn more from lectures and readings, and they are more likely to use what they learn. The current talk provides evidence on the benefits of inventing tasks, why they work, and how to make and use them.  Of course, it also shows some limitations of what instructors are typically doing instead.  

Weird Mysteries: Applying Science to the Paranormal

Speaker: 
Ben Radford (skeptic)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-10-05 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 201
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Many people believe things for which there is little evidence and no definitive proof, from astrology to psychics (and polls show that over half of the public believe in ghosts). Yet the issue is not one of belief but evidence: either ghosts, Sasquatch, and psychic powers exist or they do not; if they exist, there should be scientific proof. How good is the scientific evidence for these claims? How does a science-based investigator approach these mysteries and separate fact from fiction?

TBA

Speaker: 
Hong Liu (MIT)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-02-08 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henning 201

TBA

Speaker: 
Anatoli Polkovnikov (Boston U.)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-01-11 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henning 201
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
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