AMO Seminars

IRTG "Cold Controlled Systems" (CoCo) - Kick-off Meeting

Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2015-07-28 09:00 - Fri, 2015-07-31 16:00
Location: 
MSL 102
Local Contact: 
Takamasa Momose
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

-------------------------------------
Program: Tuesday, July 28th, 2015
MSL 102

09.00 – 09.30        Takamasa Momose, Frank Stienkemeier: Introductory remarks

A1. Interactions and Collisions Dynamics between Atoms, Molecules and Surfaces

09.30 – 10.15        Overview Topic – Marcel Mudrich "New trends in cold reactions"
10.15 – 10.35    Manish Vashishta (T. Momose)
    
10.35 – 10.55    Coffee break (MSL101)
    

Rydberg Electrons in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

Speaker: 
Robin Cote
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2015-06-23 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Valery Milner
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Impurities in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) have attracted much attention and motivated the investigation of a wide range of phenomena e.g., probing the superfluid dynamics or polaron physics in BECs. In this presentation, we explore Rydberg atoms immersed in a homogeneous BEC. We show that within the s-wave approximation, the interaction between the quasi-free Rydberg electrons and ground state atoms results in the exchange of collective excitations (phonons) leading to a Yukawa potential.

Microwaves Forces and Potentials for Ultracold Physics

Speaker: 
Seth A. M. Aubin
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2015-06-30 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
John Behr
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Microwave potentials based on the AC Zeeman effect can be used for spin-specific manipulation and trapping of ultracold atoms. Conveniently, AC Zeeman traps can confine any spin state at arbitrary magnetic fields and can simultaneously target qualitatively different potentials to individual states. Atom chips are ideal platforms for producing these traps since they can provide strong near-field potentials and gradients. Notably, the potential roughness associated with atom chip micro-magnetic traps is expected to be strongly suppressed in AC Zeeman chip traps.

Friction under microscope in a trapped-ion optical-lattice emulator

Speaker: 
Alexei Bylinskii, MIT
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2015-06-02 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Kirk Madison
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Friction is the ubiquitous mechanical process of sticking and energy dissipation at the interface between objects. According to the widely known empirical laws of friction, it is proportional to the load on the interface and independent of velocity. However, atomistic models and some atomic force probe experiments exhibit superlubricity below a critical value of the interface interaction strength, as well as a complex dependence on velocity, temperature and lattice mismatch.

Measuring Cold Molecules the Quantum Way

Speaker: 
Jordi Mur-Petit
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2015-04-07 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Roman Krems
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Experimental advances in the production of cold molecules in the last years have triggered a flurry of theoretical work in fields as diverse as precision spectroscopy, controlled chemistry, fundamental physics, or quantum computation and simulation [1,2]. Progress on these lines naturally demands an increasing level of precision in the measurement and control of molecular states and properties. In this talk, I will present two of our recent contributions to this end. First, I will review some ideas and tools of cold atomic physics and quantum information that underlie our work.

Precision Atom Interferometry

Speaker: 
Mark Kasevich (Stanford)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-01-15 17:00 - 18:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Kirk Madison
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Recent advances in atom optics and atom interferometry have enabled observation of atomic de Broglie wave interference when atomic wavepackets are separated by distances exceeding 10 cm and times of nearly 3 seconds. With further refinements, these methods may lead to meter-scale superpositions. In addition to providing new tests of quantum mechanics, these methods allow inertial force sensors of unprecedented sensitivity.

A Zeeman slower for the optimized production of laser-cooled Li and Rb gases

Speaker: 
William Bowden
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-09-25 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Henn 318
Local Contact: 
Kirk Madison
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Ultracold hetero-nuclear molecules, in particular those which possess a large intrinsic dipole moment giving rise to long range anisotropic interactions, offer scientists a novel platform to study few and many body physics with applications to quantum simulations and precision measurements.  LiRb is a promising candidate for such studies as it has a predicted dipole moment of 4 debye. A prerequisite for the formation of ultra-cold ensembles of such molecules are cold reservoirs of their respective atomic constituents produced by a magneto-optical trapping.

Quantum non-Gaussian and Gaussian States at Multiple Side-band Frequencies

Speaker: 
Katanya Kuntz, University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australia
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-07-03 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Kirk Madison
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

We simultaneously generate photon-subtracted squeezed vacuum and squeezed vacuum at three frequencies from an optical parametric oscillator by utilizing its frequency non-degenerate sidebands. Quantum non-Gaussianity is demonstrated by applying a novel character witness.

Dipole moments in long-range Rydberg molecule

Speaker: 
Seth Rittenhouse, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-06-19 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Roman Krems
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Over a decade ago, the existence of long-range Rydberg molecules was first predicted.  These diatomic molecules consist of an atom excited to a high-lying Rydberg state and another atom in its ground state.  These molecules were predicted to be very large (~0.1 micrometers) and to exhibit extreme sensitivity to external fields.  Among the most remarkable predicted properties of this system is the existence of extremely large dipole moments (~ 1 kiloDebye) in homonuclear molecules.  In recent years, the first experimental evidence for these molecules has emerged, and researchers have begun t

Robust design principles for quantum enhanced excitation transport

Speaker: 
Andreas Buchleitner
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2014-06-11 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Roman Krems
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

With the advent of new spectroscopic data a debate has been (re-)launched on      the possible role of quantum coherence for efficient photosynthetic light harvesting. While the issue in itself is still wide open, the debate between physicists specializing on quantum or biological matter stimulates challenging questions and opens new and intriguing perspectives.

Syndicate content
Website development by Checkmark Media. Designed by Armada.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Faculty of Science
Department of Physics and Astronomy
6224 Agricultural Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
Tel 604.822.3853
Fax 604.822.5324

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia