Event Time: Monday, November 18, 2019 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Location:
Henning 318
Add to Calendar 2019-11-18T15:00:00 2019-11-18T16:00:00 Deciphering the baryonic universe: from Cosmic Dawn till today Event Information: The history of baryonic structures, particularly after the epoch of "Cosmic Dawn'"- the onset of the earliest stars and galaxies - is widely considered the 'final frontier' of observational cosmology today. Over the last decade, considerable effort has gone into investigating the nature of baryonic matter, theoretically and observationally. I will overview my current research related to atomic hydrogen and its evolution over 12 billion years of cosmic time, which involves a novel data driven framework developed for interpreting current and future observations. Extensions of this model pave the way towards a comprehensive understanding of molecular gas evolution, allowing us to interpret results from ongoing surveys. I will introduce a new approach capable of unmasking the hitherto elusive nature of Damped Lyman Alpha (DLA) systems, the largest high-redshift reservoirs of atomic hydrogen. These studies open up the exciting possibility of constraining fundamental physics from the Cosmic Dawn.  Event Location: Henning 318
Event Time: Monday, November 25, 2019 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Location:
Hennings 318
Add to Calendar 2019-11-25T15:00:00 2019-11-25T16:00:00 Unveiling the stellar halo distribution with multi-wavelength photometry Event Information: The stellar halo of our Galaxy is mostly formed by stars that were initially residing in dwarf galaxies and globular clusters, which have been disrupted by the tidal field of the Milky Way. Because the structures created by these disruptions can survive for a long time, the stellar halo is the best place to probe the accretion history of our Galaxy. I will present recent work that in particular makes use of the new deep u-band component of the Canada-France-Imaging Survey (CFIS), in combination with other surveys, such as Pan-STARRS 1 and Gaia. With these observations, it have been possible to study the stellar halo using different type of stars, such as the Blue Horizontal Branch stars (BHBs) or White Dwarfs (WDs). We have recently developed a machine-learning-based algorithm that disentangles the giants from the dwarfs, and that derives their distances and metallicities with high precision, using only the available photometry. This new dataset will be extremely valuable for future studies of the stellar halo of the Milky Way, using different stellar populations, in order to reconstruct the formation history of our Galaxy and probe the dark-matter distribution that surrounds it. Event Location: Hennings 318
Event Time: Monday, December 2, 2019 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Location:
Hennings 318
Add to Calendar 2019-12-02T15:00:00 2019-12-02T16:00:00 Quenching star formation in massive galaxies Event Information: A fundamental question in galaxy evolution is how galaxies acquire diverse colours and morphologies. The current paradigm suggests that massive galaxies experienced accelerated growth in the early Universe and eventually quenched their star formation. Exactly how galaxies quench is not well-understood. Many mechanisms have been proposed in the literature, yet a definite conclusion remains elusive. I will present an overview of the current state of the art and discuss future perspectives on solving this decade-old puzzle. Event Location: Hennings 318