A Flexible New Teaching Technology for Facilitating Peer Evaluation: The ComPAIR Project at UBC

Speaker: 
James Charbonneau
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-10-18 12:45 - 13:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Joss Ives
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
We introduce ComPAIR, an open source, peer feedback and teaching technology developed at UBC that provides students a safe, flexible environment to develop the skill of evaluating another person’s work, and in turn, receive evaluations from their peers. ComPAIR is currently being used by about 40 courses here at UBC and has been installed at three external institutions. Particularly in introductory courses, the effectiveness of peer feedback can be limited by the relative newness of students to both the course content and the skills involved in providing good feedback. ComPAIR makes use of students’ inherent ability and desire to compare: according to the psychological principle of comparative judgement, novices are much better at choosing the “better” of two answers than they are at giving those answers an absolute score. By scaffolding peer feedback through comparisons, ComPAIR provides an engaging, simple, and safe environment that supports two distinct outcomes: 1) students learn how to assess their own work and that of others in a way that 2) facilitates the learning of subtle aspects of course content through the act of comparing. The presentation will focus on the usage of ComPAIR in the classroom. What kind of assignments work well? What does student workflow look like? What does the instructor workflow look like? You'll also have the opportunity to use the software from the perspective of an instructor, course administrator, and student.
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