Past Grad Thesis Talks

Thu, 2018-06-14 13:00 - 15:00
Byron Wilson

Title:Development of Trajectory-Based Techniques for the Stereotactic Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Cranial Lesions

Introduction: Stereotactic Radiosurgery is the delivery of a large, highly focused radiation dose to well defined targets in the brain. This thesis explores linac-based inverse planning algorithms that can be implemented to improve the dosimetric and delivery performance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy treatments for these indications.

Mon, 2018-05-28 09:30 - 21:30
GENE POLOVY

Abstract: (click here)

Mon, 2018-05-14 14:00 - 16:00
SHADI BALANDEH

Abstract:
Hole doped bismuth perovskite is one of the rare examples of a three-dimensional high transition temperature superconducting oxide (Tc = 34 K) without a transition metal cation. The undoped compound, BaBiO3, also shows closely interlinked electronic and structural phase transitions and a controversial insulating mechanism. Understanding the electronic structure of the parent compound, BaBiO3, can give valuable insight into both its superconducting mechanism, in particular, and into the physics of the perovskites family, in general.

Wed, 2018-05-02 14:00 - 16:00
LAURENT CHAURETTE

Abstract:

Tue, 2018-04-24 13:00 - 15:00
STEFFEN HENKELMANN

Abstract:
Elementary particle physics at the high energy frontier enables us to expand our current knowledge of fundamental physics and possibly reveal the origin and fate of the universe. The precise understanding of elementary particle properties and theory parameters predicted by the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM) as well as the revelation of new physics phenomena beyond the scope of that successful theory are at the heart of modern fundamental particle physics research. 

Fri, 2018-04-06 12:30 - 14:30
QINGDI WANG

Abstract:

Thu, 2018-03-29 14:00 - 16:00
JACOB WHITE

Abstract:
Debris discs are dynamically evolved systems that are the byproducts of the planet formation process. These systems can be used to test various planet formation theories. In my thesis I use submm-cm observations to characterize the debris in HD 141569 and Fomalhaut, as well as stellar emission that can serve as a confounding parameter in disc studies.

Wed, 2018-03-21 16:00 - 18:00
SOPHIE BERKMAN

Abstract:

Tue, 2018-03-20 16:00 - 18:00
JAMES B. GORDON

Abstract:
In the first part of this thesis we exploit supersymmetric localization to study aspects of supersymmetric gauge theories relevant to holography.

Mon, 2018-03-12 14:30 - 16:30
JIAE KIM

Abstract:

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