Past Grad Thesis Talks

Fri, 2017-08-18 09:00 - 11:00
MATTHEW GIGNAC

Abstract: check this link
 

Fri, 2017-08-18 09:00 - 11:00
MATTHEW GIGNAC

Abstract:  check this link

 

Wed, 2017-08-09 12:30 - 15:30
FUMIKA SUZUKI

Abstract:

Fri, 2017-07-28 10:30 - 12:00
MARCO MARCHETTO

Abstract:
Rare isotopes are the new frontier for fundamental studies in nuclear physics but also for medical application for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors. Rare isotopes have been produced at TRIUMF since the late nineties. A new facility, ARIEL, will increase such production three fold.

Fri, 2017-07-28 09:00 - 11:00
MARKUS SCHULZ-WEILING

Abstract:
The conditions afforded by a skimmed free-jet expansion intersected by two laser
pulses, driving resonant transitions in nitric oxide, determine the phase-space volume
of a dense molecular Rydberg ensemble. Spontaneous avalanche to plasma within
this system leads to the development of two macroscopic domains. These domains
are clearly distinguished by their polarizability as well as their locality within the
plasma. The first domain appears at the system core, is polarized by fields exceeding

Wed, 2017-07-26 12:30 - 14:30
ALI KHADEMI

Abstract:

Wed, 2017-07-19 13:00 - 15:00
EVAN THOMAS

Abstract:
We use a deformed ``center-stablised'' gauge theory, which can be brought into a weak coupling regime while remaining confined and gapped, as a toy model to study some ideas from real QCD. The deformed model has the correct nontrivial $ \theta $-dependence and degeneracy of topological sectors conjectured for QCD, and is, apparently, smoothly connected to the strongly coupled undeformed Yang-Mills, so that we can perhaps expect to get some qualitative insights into QCD.

Mon, 2017-07-17 13:00 - 15:00
TILMAN TROESTER

Abstract:
The matter content of the Universe is dominated by dark matter. Beyond its abundance and its lack of non-gravitational interactions with standard model matter, little is known about the nature of dark matter. This thesis attempts to illuminate different aspects of dark matter by using gravitational lensing in conjunction with other cosmological probes. Gravitational lensing describes the deflection of light by gravitational potentials and is a direct and unbiased probe of the matter distribution in the Universe.

Thu, 2017-07-13 12:30 - 14:30
ALEXANDRE VINCART-EMARD

Abstract:

Tue, 2017-07-11 14:00 - 16:00
ELLEN SCHELEW

Abstract:

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