Computational phases of quantum matter

Speaker: 
Robert Raussendorf, SBQMI / PHAS, UBC
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-11-09 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Robert Raussendorf
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

In condensed matter physics, the essential properties of a physical system are determined by the phase in which it resides. Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in the classification of physical phases, and it is thus pertinent to ask: What can we use quantum phases of matter for? Superconductivity is a classic example for a fundamental quantum phenomenon that finds a wide range of technological applications. It does not require fine- tuning of parameters; rather it is a property of a whole quantum phase.


In our recent work [1], [2], we demonstrate that one property which characterized quantum phases of matter is their usefulness for quantum computation.---This is a surprising connection between quantum physics and computer science.

 

Our results apply to the framework of symmetry-protected topological order (SPTO), in spatial dimension 1. In my talk, I will first cover some background material, namely measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC), MBQC and symmetry [Miyake], and MBQC and SPTO [Else et al.], and then describe our result.

 

Joint work with David Stephen, Dongsheng Wang, Abhi Prakash and Tzu-Chieh Wei.

[1] Stephen, DT; Wang, DS; Prakash, A; Wei, TC; Raussendorf, R, Computational Power of Symmetry- Protected Topological Phases, Phys. Rev. Lett 119, 010504 (2017).

[2] Raussendorf, R; Wang, DS; Prakash, A; Wei, TC; Stephen, DT, Symmetry-protected topological phases with uniform computational power in one dimension, Phys. Rev. A 96, 012302 (2017).

 

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