TRIUMF Talks

Search for New Physics with the pi -> e nu decay: First results from the TRIUMF PIENU Experiment

Speaker: 
Luca Doria (TRIUMF)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2015-06-03 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

Precision measurements and searches for rare particle decays play a major role in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. The TRIUMF PIENU experiment aims for a high precision measurement of the pi -> e nu branching ratio to test the Standard Model hypothesis of electron-muon universality and to search for evidence of new physics at the 1000 TeV mass scale. First results from PIENU on the branching ratio and the search for massive neutrino couplings to electrons will be presented.

Friction under microscope in a trapped-ion optical-lattice emulator

Speaker: 
Alexei Bylinskii (MIT)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-06-04 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

Testing Lorentz invariance: The most precise measurement of relativistic time dilation

Speaker: 
Gerald Gwinner (U Manitoba)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-05-28 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium


I will present concluding results from a series of Ives-Stilwell-type experiments at the TSR and ESR heavy ion storage rings. Using collinear laser spectroscopy on Li+ ions stored at speeds ranging from 0.03 to 0.34 c, and achieving absolute frequency accuracies at the 10^(-10) level, we have verified the relationship between the velocity beta and the time dilation factor gamma to within ± 2.3 x 10^(-9). This puts limits on Lorentz-violating test theories.

The first muon anti-neutrino disappearance results from T2K

Speaker: 
Jordan Myslik
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2015-06-09 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

 

Development of neutron electric dipole moment experiments at SNS and at Los Alamos

Speaker: 
Takeyasu Ito
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2015-05-22 11:00 - 12:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

 

The LCLS-II: a CW X-ray FEL upgrade to the LCLS Facility

Speaker: 
Tor Raubenheimer (SLAC)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-05-14 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

 

The LCLS-II is a CW X-ray FEL based on a 4 GeV superconducting RF linac that will upgrade the LCLS facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The upgrade is being constructed by a collaboration including ANL, Cornell, Fermilab, JLab, LBNL, and SLAC. The talk will describe the LCLS-II project as well as the major technical issues and R&D to address them. The talk will also describe some of the FEL R&D at the LCLS that will have a major impact on the LCLS-II capabilities.

Frontiers at the interface of astrophysics and microscopic nuclear dynamics

Speaker: 
Jeremy W. Holt (U Washington/INT)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-05-07 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

 

The Proton and the Future of Particle Physics

Speaker: 
Richard Hill (U Chicago)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-04-16 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

The venerable proton continues to play a central role in fundamental particle physics. Neutrinos scatter from protons in neutrino oscillation experiments, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are expected to scatter from protons in dark matter searches, and electrons or muons are bound by protons in precision atomic spectroscopy.

What in the World are those Exotic Hadrons?

Speaker: 
Stephen Godfrey (Carleton)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-04-02 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

In the last ten years there has been an explosion of newly discovered exotic mesons that do not fit into our current understanding of QCD, the theory of the strong interactions. The speculation is that we've discovered new forms of hadronic matter; hadronic molecules, tetraquarks and mesons with excited gluonic degrees of freedom.

A Window into New Physics via Heavy Quarks

Speaker: 
Hassan Jawahery (U Maryland)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-03-12 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium

The Standard Model of elementary particles and forces has had tremendous success in describing all laboratory-based observations of the properties of particles and their interactions. Yet, experimental observations and theoretical arguments point to the presence of new physics beyond the Standard Model.  These could be in the form of new particles and interactions, extra dimensions or other solutions yet to be formulated. The search for evidence of this new physics is the primary focus of research in particle physics today.

Syndicate content
Website development by Checkmark Media. Designed by Armada.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Faculty of Science
Department of Physics and Astronomy
6224 Agricultural Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
Tel 604.822.3853
Fax 604.822.5324

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia