TRIUMF Talks

MEASURING the ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENT of the PROTON

Speaker: 
Richard Talman (Cornell University)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-09-13 14:00 - 15:15
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Electric dipole moment (EDM) measurements may help to answer the question "Why is there more matter than anti-matter in the present universe?'' For a charged baryon like the proton such a measurement is thinkable only in a storage ring in which a bunch of protons is stored for more than a few minutes, with polarization "frozen'' (relative to the beam velocity) and with polarization not attenuated by decoherence.

Update on the Search for the Higgs Boson at the LHC

Speaker: 
Oliver Stelzer-Chilton (TRIUMF)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-07-05 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The search for the Higgs boson has continued at high pace at ATLAS and CMS. Using the latest LHC data from 2012, both collaboration have updated their analyses. This talk will summarize the latest results on the search for the HIggs boson as presented at the CERN seminar on July 4th.

DISCOVERY and p-VALUES

Speaker: 
Louis Lyons (Oxford University)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-05-17 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

(Outline format)

CLAS discovery and un-discovery of penta-quarks
Distinguishing a peak from a statistical fluctuation 
Goodness of fit, or hypothesis testing?
Test statistic
Why 5 sigma for discovery?
Blind analyses
What p-values are and what they are not
p-values and likelihood ratios
Combining p-values
Bayesian methods
Simultaneous optimisation for discovery and exclusion.
Incorporating systematic effects

PARAMETER DETERMINATION BY LIKELIHOOD: DO's and DONT's

Speaker: 
Louis Lyons (Oxford University)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2012-05-16 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

(Outline format)

Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate.
Simple examples: (1) Peak mass and width (2) Lifetime
Binned and unbinned likelihood
Several parameters
Extended maximum likelihood.
Common misconceptions:
Normalisation
delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage
Integrating the likelihood
Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit?
Punzi effect

Fundamental Symmetries and the Neutron

Speaker: 
Tim Chupp (Michigan)
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2012-05-01 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Fundamental neutron physics impacts physics at many scales from the origin of the elements produced in the early universe to the structure of the Standard Model and possible extensions. In particular neutron decay is studied in both beams and bottles or ultra-cold neutrons. The neutron lifetime, about 880 seconds, determines the abundance of the light elements as well as the fundamental strength of the limiting rate in the solar energy cycle.

Hiding supersymmetry from the LHC

Speaker: 
Thomas Grégoire (Carleton)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-04-26 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Supersymmetry is one of the preferred frameworks for solving the hierarchy problem. However, to this day, there is no concrete evidence for it. In particular, LHC is putting very strong constraints on the parameter space of supersymmetric models. In this talk I will summarize the implications of LHC searches for weak scale supersymmetry and present frameworks that attempt to evade LHC bounds while preserving the success of supersymmetry in solving the hierarchy problem. In particular I will discuss a model with Dirac gauginos and broken R-parity.

Design and status of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

Speaker: 
Milind Diwan (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-03-15 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
NRC IFCI Building, room 1310
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

I will review the scientific motivation for an ambitious long-baseline accelerator neutrino program. I will then describe the current status of the LBNE project at FNAL including the design of the beam and far and near detectors.

 

The New Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass by CDF

Speaker: 
Oliver Stelzer-Chilton, TRIUMF
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-03-01 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

It is through radiative quantum corrections that the W boson mass is sensitive to other particles. As a result, it can be used to set a significant constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The approach of an indirect constraint was already quite successful in the eventual discovery of the top quark in 1995. The indirect Higgs boson mass constraint is currently limited by the uncertainty on the direct W boson mass measurement. The new CDF result represented the most precise measurement of the W boson mass to date and now dominates the world average.

Computer simulations of convection and magnetic field generation in planets

Speaker: 
Gary Glatzmaier
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-02-24 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF auditorium
Local Contact: 
Barry Davids, davids@triumf.ca
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Observations of the zonal winds and magnetic fields on giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn beg the questions of what flows and fields exist well below their surfaces and how are they maintained.  In roughly five years, NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter and the Cassini Solstice mission at Saturn will provide near-surface measurements of the gravity and magnetic fields of these giant planets that will help to answer these questions.  These problems are also being studied via computer simulations, which will provide predictions for what may be discovered at Jupiter and Saturn.

The FAIR chance for nuclear astrophysics

Speaker: 
Karlheinz Langanke, GSI
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2012-02-21 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Local Contact: 
Barry Davids, davids@triumf.ca
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

In the coming years the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research will be constructed at the GSI campus in Darmstadt, Germany. Together with next-generation radioactive ion-beam facilities in America, Europe and Japan FAIR will start a new era of nuclear astrophysics research. The talk will outline some of these unique opportunities, in particular focussing on supernova dynamics and explosive nucleosynthesis.

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