TRIUMF Talks

Hiding supersymmetry from the LHC

Speaker: 
Thomas Grégoire (Carleton)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-04-26 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Supersymmetry is one of the preferred frameworks for solving the hierarchy problem. However, to this day, there is no concrete evidence for it. In particular, LHC is putting very strong constraints on the parameter space of supersymmetric models. In this talk I will summarize the implications of LHC searches for weak scale supersymmetry and present frameworks that attempt to evade LHC bounds while preserving the success of supersymmetry in solving the hierarchy problem. In particular I will discuss a model with Dirac gauginos and broken R-parity.

Design and status of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

Speaker: 
Milind Diwan (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-03-15 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
NRC IFCI Building, room 1310
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

I will review the scientific motivation for an ambitious long-baseline accelerator neutrino program. I will then describe the current status of the LBNE project at FNAL including the design of the beam and far and near detectors.

 

The New Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass by CDF

Speaker: 
Oliver Stelzer-Chilton, TRIUMF
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-03-01 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

It is through radiative quantum corrections that the W boson mass is sensitive to other particles. As a result, it can be used to set a significant constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The approach of an indirect constraint was already quite successful in the eventual discovery of the top quark in 1995. The indirect Higgs boson mass constraint is currently limited by the uncertainty on the direct W boson mass measurement. The new CDF result represented the most precise measurement of the W boson mass to date and now dominates the world average.

Computer simulations of convection and magnetic field generation in planets

Speaker: 
Gary Glatzmaier
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-02-24 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF auditorium
Local Contact: 
Barry Davids, davids@triumf.ca
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Observations of the zonal winds and magnetic fields on giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn beg the questions of what flows and fields exist well below their surfaces and how are they maintained.  In roughly five years, NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter and the Cassini Solstice mission at Saturn will provide near-surface measurements of the gravity and magnetic fields of these giant planets that will help to answer these questions.  These problems are also being studied via computer simulations, which will provide predictions for what may be discovered at Jupiter and Saturn.

The FAIR chance for nuclear astrophysics

Speaker: 
Karlheinz Langanke, GSI
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2012-02-21 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Local Contact: 
Barry Davids, davids@triumf.ca
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

In the coming years the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research will be constructed at the GSI campus in Darmstadt, Germany. Together with next-generation radioactive ion-beam facilities in America, Europe and Japan FAIR will start a new era of nuclear astrophysics research. The talk will outline some of these unique opportunities, in particular focussing on supernova dynamics and explosive nucleosynthesis.

Searches for Exotic Physics with leptons and photons with the ATLAS Detector

Speaker: 
Dominique Fortin, TRIUMF
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-02-09 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
With the large 5 fb-1 sample of pp collisions recorded in 2011, ATLAS has taken full advantage of the opportunity to explore new territory at the TeV scale. In this seminar, an overview of searches for new exotic particles is presented, with an emphasis on signatures with very energetic leptons and photons.

Theory for Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

Speaker: 
Adam Burrows (Princeton University)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-03-22 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
NRC IFCI Building, room 1310
Local Contact: 
Barry Davids ( davids@triumf.ca )
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Core-collapse supernovae are a puzzle that has challenged theorists and computational science for half a century. Such explosions are the source of many of the heavy elements in the Universe and the birthplace of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. However, determining the mechanism of explosion remains the key goal of theory. Recently, using sophisticated numerical tools and computers, theorists have been able to conduct multi-dimensional simulations with some physical fidelity that have provided insight into the phenonoma that attend stellar death and explosion.

EXO - A Search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Xenon

Speaker: 
David Sinclair (Carleton University and TRIUMF)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-01-12 14:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Neutrinoless double beta decay offers a window on some unique and important properties of the neutrino. This process is only possible if neutrinos are Majorana particles which is of great theoretical interest. The observation would provide a determination of the mass scale for neutrinos which would provide a laboratory measurement to complement the cosmological determinations. However, the measurement is extremely difficult. This talk will describe the EXO experiment which is searching for this process in xenon.

Identity, gender and persistence in science

Speaker: 
Marie-Claire Shanahan (University of Alberta)
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2011-11-25 14:00
Location: 
NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, 4250 Wesbrook Mall

This presentation will examine identity as a way of understanding gender patterns in participation and persistence in science, physics in particular. Considering these issues from the perspective of identity brings together findings related to interest, motivation, confidence, achievement, stereotypes and recognition and provides a focus for engaging in activities to encourage and support students at all levels.

New Aspects of the Structure of Exotic Nuclei

Speaker: 
Augusto Macchiavelli (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2011-11-17 14:00
Location: 
NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, 4250 Wesbrook Mall

The structure of nuclei far from the stability line is a central theme of research in nuclear physics. Key to the success of this program has been the worldwide development of radioactive beam facilities and novel detector systems, which provide the tools needed to produce and study these nuclei.

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