TRIUMF Talks

The Proton Radius Puzzle: A Challenge to all of us

Speaker: 
Gerald Miller (University of Washington, Seattle)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-01-31 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The extremely precise extraction of the proton radius by Pohl et al. from the measured energy difference between the 2P and 2S states of muonic hydrogen disagrees significantly with that extracted from electronic hydrogen or elastic electron-proton scattering. This is the proton radius puzzle. The origins of the puzzle and the reasons for believing it to be very significant are explained. Various possible solutions of the puzzle are identified, and the future work needed to resolve the puzzle is discussed.

Observation of Zitterbewegung in a degenerate quantum gas

Speaker: 
I. B. Spielman (University of Maryland and National Institute of Standards and Technology)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-01-24 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

Here I present our experimental work on Bose-Einstein condensates, systems of ultra-cold charge neutral atoms at a temperature of about 100 nano-Kelvin: one billion times colder than room temperature. These condensates – quantum gases – are nearly perfect quantum mechanical systems, and here we demonstrate a technique by which these charge neutral particles have artificial spin-orbit coupling, of a form more well known in material systems.

Neutrinos from stored muon beams: an incremental approach to the Neutrino Factory

Speaker: 
Ken Long (Imperial College, London)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2013-02-20 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The study of the neutrino is the study of physics beyond the Standard Model. Now that theta13 has been measured, the focus of the long-baseline neutrino-oscillation programme is to determine the mass hierarchy and to search for leptonic CP-invariance violation. In parallel, some anomalies in short- baseline oscillations can be interpreted as hints for sterile neutrinos.

Recent Results on the Limit of Weak Tensor Currents from 8Li Beta-decay

Speaker: 
Matthew Sternberg (University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-01-10 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Precise measurements of the beta-neutrino angular correlation coefficient, ‘a’, provide information on the presence of possible exotic couplings in the weak interaction. In the beta-decay of 8Li to 8Be* and subsequent breakup into two alpha particles, the large Q value and the beta-alpha-neutrino correlation provide enhanced sensitivity to any potential tensor coupling. An initial measurement using the Beta-decay Paul Trap (BPT) at Argonne National Laboratory detected 2•10^4 beta-alpha-alpha coincidences, resulting in an upper limit of 1.5% on any tensor contribution.

Neutrino Beams: Principles and Implementation

Speaker: 
Eric Zimmerman (University of Colorado, Boulder and TRIUMF)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-11-29 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Local Contact: 
Akira Konaka
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Some of the most dramatic progress in particle physics in the past twenty years has come from the neutrino sector. Accelerator-based neutrino beams are at the heart of many recent advances, and will be key to making progress in the future. These beams have evolved into major facilities whose design, construction, operation, and analysis form a lively subfield within experimental high-energy physics.

MEASURING the ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENT of the PROTON

Speaker: 
Richard Talman (Cornell University)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-09-13 14:00 - 15:15
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Electric dipole moment (EDM) measurements may help to answer the question "Why is there more matter than anti-matter in the present universe?'' For a charged baryon like the proton such a measurement is thinkable only in a storage ring in which a bunch of protons is stored for more than a few minutes, with polarization "frozen'' (relative to the beam velocity) and with polarization not attenuated by decoherence.

Update on the Search for the Higgs Boson at the LHC

Speaker: 
Oliver Stelzer-Chilton (TRIUMF)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-07-05 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The search for the Higgs boson has continued at high pace at ATLAS and CMS. Using the latest LHC data from 2012, both collaboration have updated their analyses. This talk will summarize the latest results on the search for the HIggs boson as presented at the CERN seminar on July 4th.

DISCOVERY and p-VALUES

Speaker: 
Louis Lyons (Oxford University)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-05-17 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

(Outline format)

CLAS discovery and un-discovery of penta-quarks
Distinguishing a peak from a statistical fluctuation 
Goodness of fit, or hypothesis testing?
Test statistic
Why 5 sigma for discovery?
Blind analyses
What p-values are and what they are not
p-values and likelihood ratios
Combining p-values
Bayesian methods
Simultaneous optimisation for discovery and exclusion.
Incorporating systematic effects

PARAMETER DETERMINATION BY LIKELIHOOD: DO's and DONT's

Speaker: 
Louis Lyons (Oxford University)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2012-05-16 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

(Outline format)

Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate.
Simple examples: (1) Peak mass and width (2) Lifetime
Binned and unbinned likelihood
Several parameters
Extended maximum likelihood.
Common misconceptions:
Normalisation
delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage
Integrating the likelihood
Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit?
Punzi effect

Fundamental Symmetries and the Neutron

Speaker: 
Tim Chupp (Michigan)
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2012-05-01 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
TRIUMF Auditorium
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Fundamental neutron physics impacts physics at many scales from the origin of the elements produced in the early universe to the structure of the Standard Model and possible extensions. In particular neutron decay is studied in both beams and bottles or ultra-cold neutrons. The neutron lifetime, about 880 seconds, determines the abundance of the light elements as well as the fundamental strength of the limiting rate in the solar energy cycle.

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