Graduate Students Seminars

Modelling Grid Cells, Place Cells, and the Subconscious GPS

Speaker: 
Alan Manning
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-06-22 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jared Stang
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

Go into a room, close your eyes, and walk around without touching anything. How do you know when you are about to bump into something? How do you know how far you've traveled? We clearly possess a subconscious spatial map of our environment and location and can use it without the aide of sight. In this talk I will explain how this map is created using Grid Cells and Place Cells and present a model of their firing based on oscillator interference.

Real-life Optics and Optical Illusions

Speaker: 
Ellen Schelew
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-06-01 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 318

Is it possible to see a full circle rainbow? How can you trick your brain into seeing a 3D image on a flat sheet of paper? In this "how stuff works" style talk, I will use basic physics to explain a few everyday optical phenomena. Get ready to cross your eyes and ponder some simple wonders.

Gone in an Instanton

Speaker: 
Ariel Sibilia
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-05-18 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Computer simulations in physics and how we explore the glass phase

Speaker: 
Anton Smessaert
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-03-30 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Hennings 304 (different room!)
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

Medical Physics: Application of Physics for Detecting, Staging and Treating Cancers

Speaker: 
Jen Moroz
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-03-02 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 304 (different room!)
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

 

Introduction to Quantum Oscillations in YBa2Cu3O6.59

Speaker: 
Brad Ramshaw (UBC)
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2011-10-28 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Much like the valence electrons in an atom, the electrons at the Fermi surface of a metal are the electrons in the highest occupied energy levels. Because of the proximity of these electrons to unoccupied states, all low energy excitations (such as electric and magnetic fields, thermal gradients, mechanical strains, etc...) happen at the Fermi surface. This makes the Fermi surface an object of great interest when trying to understand the properties of a metal, and when trying to come up with microscopic theories to explain phenomena like magnetism and superconductivity.
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