Condensed Matter Seminars

The photo-Nernst effect in graphene

Speaker: 
David Cobden, Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-10-29 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Josh Folk
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Scanning photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying the spatially resolved optoelectronic and electrical properties of a device. In graphene devices in a perpendicular magnetic field we observe photocurrent generated uniformly along the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. The signal is antisymmetric in field, shows a peak versus gate voltage at the neutrality point flanked by wings of opposite sign at low fields, and exhibits quantum oscillations at higher fields.

Edge currents in chiral superfluids and superconductors

Speaker: 
Wen Huang (McMaster and KITP)
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2015-10-13 13:00 - 14:00
Location: 
Hennings 309
Local Contact: 
Marcel Franz
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Cooper pairs in two-dimensional chiral superfluids and superconductors carry non-zero and quantized orbital angular

[CANCELLED]

Speaker: 
Philip Phillips, University of Illinois
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-12-10 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
George Sawatzky

Although the copper-oxide superconductors were discovered almost 30 years ago, there is no consensus on why they superconduct.  The problem starts with their unusual normal state properties which deviate strongly from the standard theory of metals.  As a window into how odd these materials are I will focus on the optical conductivity.  The optical conductivity possesses a strange power-law scaling that is so befuddling that even string theorists have tried t

Superconductivity, diamagnetism, mean inner potential and charge asymmetry of condensed matter

Speaker: 
Jorge Hirsch
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-12-03 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
George Sawatzky
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Each of the four concepts in the title is related to its nearest neighbor concept(s): this is well understood and generally agreed upon. What is not generally agreed upon is that these four concepts are all intimately related to each other, on the contrary, this is at odds with the conventional understanding of superconductivity (BCS).

Short stories in soft condensed matter of how complex behavior in membrane systems arises from minimal components

Speaker: 
Sarah Keller, University of Washington
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-11-26 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

This talk will briefly summarize our laboratory’s recent condensed matter research inspired by biological questions. Asking how sub-micron composition fluctuations might arise in a lipid membrane near a critical point led to our determination of the membrane’s effective critical dynamic exponent -- the first successful systematic measurement of this fundamental physical parameter in any 2-dimensional Ising system with conserved order parameter, whether biological or n

Crystal Growth and High-Pressure Synthesis of Solid-State Materials

Speaker: 
Nikolai Zhigadlo, Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-11-12 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Local Contact: 
Andrea Damascelli
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

High-pressure conditions are often crucial for the successful synthesis of new materials, including many modern superconductors.

Engineering Domain Walls and Planar Rumpling to Create a Room-Temperature Multiferroic

Speaker: 
Julia Mundy, UC Berkeley
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-11-05 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jenny Hoffman
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Unusual electronic properties arise at interfaces in materials with strongly correlated electrons due to the low local symmetry combined with the sensitivity of these materials to geometric confinement, electrostatics and strain.  In addition to heterointerfaces, domain walls in ferroics can exhibit properties that are markedly different than the parent material.  

Mapping Optoelectronic Properties at their Native Length Scale in Lead Halide Perovskites and 2-D MoSe2

Speaker: 
Alexander Weber-Bargioni, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-10-15 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Understanding and eventually controlling opto electronic processes at the native length scale, e.g. deliberately transporting excitons to predetermined sites where they perform work, will provide the access to a new parameter space for the development of next generation light harvesting materials.

Imaging molecules: A journey from real to reciprocal space and back

Speaker: 
Stefan Tautz, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich & Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-10-08 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Imaging surface adsorbed molecules as precisely as possible is a fascinating goal, the attainment of which promises to open up many new possibilities in nanoscale engineering. For some time, scanning probe methods have been employed to image the electronic structure (scanning tunnelling microscopy) and, more recently, the geometric structure (atomic force microscopy) and charge distribution (Kelvin probe force microscopy) of molecules in real space.

Organic Solar Cells based on Diluted Heterojunction

Speaker: 
Moritz Riede, Oxford University
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2015-09-24 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Organic solar cells (OSC) have attracted increasing attention from academia and industry in recent years. Power conversion efficiencies (PCE) have reached more than 10% and lifetimes of more than 10y are expected. The architecture used for the most efficient OSC is based on the bulk heterojunction, a layer consisting of a 1:4 to 1:1 mixture (by weight or volume) of donor and acceptor molecules.

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