Condensed Matter Seminars

Green function for the nonlinear Luttinger Liquid from nonlinear steepest descent

Speaker: 
Tom Price (Cambridge University, UK)
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2016-03-08 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Henn 318
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
We discuss the time dependent Green function of the nonlinear Luttinger liquid, using the Fractional Quantum Hall edge as an example. The Green function can be written as a Fredholm determinant, whose long time asymptotics we find by solving an associated Riemann--Hilbert problem using the method of nonlinear steepest descent. The results agree exactly with the mobile impurity model, which has a simple interpretation as a factorization of the solution to the asymptotic Riemann--Hilbert problem.

Photoemission Electron Microscopy for Ultrafast Nano-Optics: Femtoseconds to Attoseconds

Speaker: 
Erik Marsell, Lund University (Sweden)
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2016-02-26 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Nano-optics, the use of nanostructured surfaces for the concentration, manipulation, and application of light on a sub-wavelength scale, is a maturing technology capable of connecting the worlds of photonics and electronics. This opens up possibilities for devices combining the small size currently only found in electronics with the high operating speed offered by photonics. However, the simultaneous small and fast nature of the nano-optical excitations calls for characterization methods with extreme spatiotemporal resolution.

Charge Order in NbSe2

Speaker: 
Felix Flicker (UC Berkeley)
Event Date and Time: 
Wed, 2016-02-10 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Marcel Franz
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Niobium diselenide has long served as a prototype of two-dimensional charge ordering, believed to arise from an instability of the electronic structure analogous to the one-dimensional Peierls mechanism

Anomalous Dimensions and Unparticles in the Cuprate Superconductors

Speaker: 
Philip Phillips
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2016-03-10 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
George Sawatzky
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

High-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates remains an unsolved problem because no knock-down experiment has  revealed unambiguously the nature of the charge carriers in the normal state.

**NOTE LOCATION: AMPEL 311** Atomic Dynamics via meV-Resolution X-Ray Scattering: New Results on High-Temperature Superconductors

Speaker: 
Alfred Baron, Materials Dynamics Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2016-02-25 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Local Contact: 
George Sawatzky
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

High-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) measures atomic motions at THz frequencies over angstrom-scale correlation lengths.

Atomic-resolution studies of materials by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

Speaker: 
Ondrej L. Krivanek, Arizona State University
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2016-03-03 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
George Sawatzky
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) are now able to form electron probes as small as 0.5 Å in diameter, and they can image and spectroscopically analyze single atoms in-situ.  Nion Co., has pioneered these advances, by developing the first aberration corrector that improved spatial resolution of an electron microscope to better than 1 Å, and later on by developing a new STEM that can acquire images and high quality spectra from single atoms in many different types of materials.  More recently, we have introduced a monochromated STEM system for el

Correlated electrons from the bottom up: application to high-Tc cuprates

Speaker: 
Lucas Wagner, UIUC
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2016-02-09 13:00 - 14:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
George Sawatzky/Mona Berciu
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

First principles calculations, in which materials are simulated using only fundamental constants, are a powerful way to study electronic structure of materials.

Hacking the Superconducting Nanowire: Detecting Single Photons, Resurrecting the Cryotron, and Pushing Current Around Corners

Speaker: 
Karl Berggren, MIT
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2016-03-31 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Superconducting nanowires have long been of interest for their unusual electrothermal behavior, and the exhibition of quantum phase slips--twists in the electron wavefunction that can occur spontaneously in the right environment.  However, they have also demonstrated themselves recently to be of key importance to the field of photodetection, with important applications in communications and metrology.

Cavity Optomechanics in a Millikelvin Environment

Speaker: 
John Davis, University of Alberta
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2016-02-11 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Sarah Burke
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

In the past decade a revolution has taken place in our ability to measure mechanical motion, originating in large part from experiments at gravitational observatories.  Such observatories use massive optical cavities to explore the tiny changes in displacement that could be caused by passing gravitational waves.

The Nature of Fermi-liquids, an Optical Perspective

Speaker: 
Damien Stricker, Universite de Geneve
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2016-02-04 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

A reference point for research on a wider range of correlated behaviour is provided by the so-called Fermi liquids, characterized by a relaxation rate (ħω)2 + (pπkBT)2.

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