Condensed Matter Seminars

Ultrafast Dynamics of Excited Carries in Graphene

Speaker: 
Alberto Crepaldi (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2014-01-16 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Andrea Damascelli
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The transport and optical properties of graphene are made unique by the linear dispersion of the Dirac particles at the K point of its Brillouin zone [1]. Exploiting graphene for opto-electronic and light-harvesting devices requires a detailed knowledge of the physics describing the electron-hole pair generation and recombination, after optical perturbation [1]. Electron-phonon scattering is expected to play a central role in the relaxation processes. Nonetheless, the microscopic  mechanisms are still under-debate [2].

Scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies of charge ordering and rotational symmetry breaking in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x

Speaker: 
Eduardo H da Silva Neto, UBC
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-11-07 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Andrea Damascelli
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Understanding the mechanism of superconductivity and its interplay with other possible ordered states in high transition temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors remains one of the most significant challenges in all of condensed matter physics. In this talk I will discuss scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements which establish the formation of charge ordering in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212).

Disorder, interactions, and zero-bias anomalies

Speaker: 
Rachel Wortis, Trent University
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-10-24 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Mona Berciu
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Many of the most interesting electronic behaviors arise in materials with strong electron-electron correlations.  Many of these same materials are disordered either intrinsically or due to doping.  The study of how electrons behave in the presence of both disorder and interactions has a long history, yet the regime of strong disorder and strong interactions remains poorly understood.  The density of states is one measure of the electrons which is readily accessible to both theorists and experimentalists.

Observation of Majorana quantum critical behavior in a resonant level coupled to a dissipative environment.

Speaker: 
Gleb Finkelstein, Duke University
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-11-14 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Joshua Folk
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

We investigate tunneling through a resonant level embedded in a dissipative environment, which suppresses tunneling rates at low temperatures.

Oxide Nanoelectronics On Demand

Speaker: 
Jeremy Levy, University of Pittsburgh
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-10-31 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Joshua Folk
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Electronic confinement at nanoscale dimensions remains a central means of science and technology.

Helical edge resistance introduced by charge puddles

Speaker: 
Leonid Glazman, Yale University
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2013-10-11 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
TBA
Local Contact: 
Joshua Folk
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Electron puddles created by doping of a 2D topological insulator may violate the ideal helical edge conductance. Because of a long electron dwelling time, even a single puddle may lead to a significant inelastic backscattering. We find the resulting correction to the perfect edge conductance. Generalizing to multiple puddles, we assess the dependence of the helical edge resistance on temperature and doping level.

Rescheduled!

Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-10-17 14:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Mona Berciu
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

No seminar today

Fictitious fields for light: topological insulators and pseudomagnetism

Speaker: 
Mikael Rechtsman, Technion
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-09-19 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Marcel Franz
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

In this talk I present two examples (time permitting) in which ‘fictitious fields’ can lead to surprising photon dynamics that would be difficult (if not impossible) to achieve with real fields. The first is the case of 'photonic' topological insulators.  Topological insulators are solid-state materials that are insulators in the bulk but have intrinsic surface states that behave metallically, and are completely robust to any type of defects or disorder.

At the interface between electron- and hole-doped curates

Speaker: 
Marcel Hoek, University of Twente
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-07-18 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Local Contact: 
Elfimov, Ilya
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

We report on the fabrication of in-plane ramp-edge structures between c-axis oriented superconducting Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 (NCCO) and La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 (LSCO). The ab-plane contact allows us to explore p/n physics in the rich phase diagram of the cuprates.

Detecting Non-Abelian Anyons by Charging Spectroscopy

Speaker: 
Gilad Ben-Shach
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2013-06-18 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311
Local Contact: 
Joshua Folk
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Observation of non-Abelian statistics for the charge e/4 quasiparticles in the v=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state remains an outstanding experimental problem. The non-Abelian statistics are linked to the presence of additional low energy states in a system with localised quasiparticles, and hence an additional low-temperature entropy. Recent experiments, which detect changes in the number of quasiparticles trapped in a local potential well as a function of an applied gate voltage, provide a possibility for measuring this entropy, if carried out over a suitable range of temperatures.

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