Condensed Matter Seminars

The interaction of magnetism and superconductivity, and the development of superconducting spintronics

Speaker: 
Mark Blamire, Department of Materials Science, University of Cambridge, UK
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-05-17 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
AMPL 311

The discovery in 2010, using superconductor / ferromagnet / superconductor Josephson junctions, that it is possible to controllably create triplet Cooper pairs in which the electrons have parallel spins created the field of superconducting spin electronics (superspintronics) [1]. However, even if triplet pairing implies that supercurrents can carry spin, this is not in itself sufficient to create functioning superspintronic devices.  In parallel, a variety of other interactions between singlet superconductivity and magnetism have been actively explored.

Strong disorder Wegner flow and 1d localization transitions

Speaker: 
Gil Refael, Taylor W. Lawrence Professor of Theoretical Physics; Executive Officer for Physics, California Institute of Technology
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-03-01 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Marcel Franz

Localization is one of the most staggering effects of quantum mechanics.The discovery of many-body localization makes the phenomenon even more broad, and suggests that the delocalization transition might give rise to a new paradigm of quantum dynamical phase transitions. In my talk I will explore the use of Wegner flow methods for analyzing the the delocalization transitions in disordered chains with power-law long-range hopping, as well as in the random field Heisenberg model.

Entanglement Entropy and Topological Order in Quantum Spin Liquids

Speaker: 
Julia Wildeboer, University of Kentucky
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-02-08 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Marcel Franz

Anderson's idea of a (short-ranged) resonating valence bond (RVB) spin liquid has been the first ever proposal
of what we now call a topologically ordered phase. Since then, a wealth of exactly solvable lattice models has been
constructed that have topologically ordered ground states.
For a long time, however, it has been difficult to realize Anderson's original vision, according to which the
ground state has an unbroken SU(2) spin rotational symmetry, and is dominated by fluctuation of singlet valence bonds.

Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL) Scalpel: Achieving Fundamental (Single Cell) Limits to Minimally Invasive Surgery and Biodiagnostics

Speaker: 
R. J. Dwayne Miller, The Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg, Germany and, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Toronto
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-01-18 12:30 - 13:30
Location: 
AMPEL #311

Mapping Atomic Motions with Ultrabright Electrons: Realization of the Chemists’ Gedanken Experiment

Speaker: 
R. J. Dwayne Miller, The Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg, Germany and, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Toronto
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-01-18 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Chemistry C126
Local Contact: 
Josh Folk, Ian Affleck

With the development of ultrabright electron sources capable of literally lighting up atomic motions, the fundamental space-time limit to imaging chemistry has been achieved.

Quantum magnetism on a chip

Speaker: 
Richard G. Harris, Principal Scientist, D-Wave Systems Inc.
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-01-11 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Josh Folk

Feynman's original vision for a quantum computer was of a physical quantum system whose Hamiltonian could be adjusted in situ in order to simulate the physics of other quantum systems.  Quantum magnetic systems, with localized spins and short range interactions, are perhaps the simplest such physical quantum system that can be implemented in existing solid state technologies.  This lecture will review how a D-Wave 2X quantum annealing processor can be used to realize quantum phase transitions in the transverse field Ising model on an embedded 3-dimensional lattice.

Quantum simulations of dynamical response functions for strongly correlated quasi-one dimensional materials

Speaker: 
Alberto Nocera, University of Tennessee
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-01-25 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings #318
Local Contact: 
Marcel Franz
Dynamical response functions of strongly correlated quantum systems provide crucial infor-
mation about their complex physical behavior. For example, in layered high Tc superconduc-
tors, pairing could be linked to the unusual structure of spin excitations with a spin gap at low
energies and a magnetic resonance with an universal hourglass dispersion.

Using Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering to study quasiparticle fractionalization in quasi-one-dimensional cuprates

Speaker: 
Steve Johnston, University of Tennessee
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2018-01-05 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Mona Berciu

One-dimensional (1D) magnetic materials have attracted significant interest as a platform for studying phenomena such as quasiparticle fractionalization and quantum criticality. The spin-1/2 1D Heisenberg antiferromagnet is a vital system;  its elementary excitations are chargeless spin-1/2 quasiparticles called spinons that are created in pairs.

Quantum supremacy: checking a quantum computer with a classical supercomputer

Speaker: 
John Martinis, University of California at Santa Barbara
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2017-11-30 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings #201
Local Contact: 
Josh Folk
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

As microelectronics technology nears the end of exponential growth over time, known as Moore’s law, there is a renewed interest in new computing paradigms such as quantum computing.   A key step in the roadmap to build a scientifically or commercially useful quantum computer will be to demonstrate its exponentially growing computing power.

Nanoengineering materials: a bottom-up approach towards understanding long outstanding challenges in condensed materials science

Speaker: 
Al-Amin Dhirani, Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Toronto
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2017-11-10 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Josh Folk

Chemists have made tremendous advances in synthesizing a variety of nanostructures with control over their size, shape, and chemical composition. Plus, it is possible to control nanostructure assembly and to make macroscopic materials. This affords an opportunity to realize a wide range of controlled and potentially even new behaviours. 

 

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