Condensed Matter Seminars

Prof. Joe Trodahl from MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington

Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-10-18 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

Controlling the flow of electronic spin in addition to the charge promises speed and power demand advantages. However, there are as yet few “spintronic” devices on the market, in part due to a lack of intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductors that would permit full exploitation of the coupled spin/charge technology. To date the only full series of such materials are the mononitrides of the lanthanides, the 14 rare-earth elements.

Moiré is Different: Wigner Solidification at Magic Angles in Doped Twisted bi-layer Graphene

Speaker: 
Prof. Philip W. Phillips from the University of Illinois
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-11-29 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

In a recent paper, the MIT group led Pablo Jarillo-Herrero has found that doping twisted bi-layer graphene can generate strongly correlated insulating states and superconductivity at particular twist angles called magic angles.  

This problem has excited the condensed matter community because it establishes that graphene, normally viewed as a weakly  interacting system, is a new platform for strongly correlated physics.   

Microwave signatures of Z2 and Z4 fractional Josephson effects

Speaker: 
Dr. Pedro Lopes, from QMI
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-10-11 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPL 311

Fractional Josephson effects comprise some of the main signatures of topological features and quasi-particle fractionalization in Josephson junctions.

Linear-, Nonlinear- and Hydrodynamics in Quantum Materials.

Speaker: 
Prof. Prineha Narang, from Harvard University
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-10-25 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPL 311

Today, we imagine a world where we can engineer materials and devices atom-by-atom. Exciting discoveries during the past few decades in quantum science and technology have brought us to this next step in the quantum revolution: the ability to fabricate, image and measure materials and their properties at the level of single atoms is almost within our grasp. Yet, at the most fundamental level a tractable quantum mechanical description and understanding of these materials does not exist.

Recent results of REXS and RIXS experiments on quantum materials

Speaker: 
Dr. Bernhard Keimer, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-10-01 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

We will describe how resonant elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering (REXS and RIXS) yield comprehensive, energy- and momentum resolved information about the ground state and excitation spectra of quantum materials. The unprecedented sensitivity of RIXS now allows experiments on dispersive excitations in monolayers and microcrystals of complex quantum materials that were hard to imagine just a few years ago.
We will go through several examples where REXS and RIXS have yielded qualitatively new insight:

Computing Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering Spectra Using The Density Matrix Renormalization Group Method

Speaker: 
Dr. Alberto Nocera, Research Associate at SBQMI
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-09-20 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
Hennings 318

Over the past decade, Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering spectroscopy (RIXS) has been established as a powerful technique to study the energy-momentum structure of charge, orbital, lattice, and magnetic excitations of strongly correlated materials.
The computation of RIXS spectra starting from model Hamiltonians is often a formidable task because of the absence of accurate many-body tools,
particularly when many orbitals are active. In most cases, exact diagonalization (ED) techniques are used which restricts clusters to a relatively small size.

From solids with topology to black holes and back

Speaker: 
Pr. Marcel Franz from UBC
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-09-13 02:00 - 03:00
Location: 
AMPL 311

Inclusion of topological phenomena in condensed matter physics over the past 10 years ushered a revolution in this field. As a result of the new theoretical insights entire classes of materials with exotic properties have been discovered, including topological insulators, Dirac and Weyl semimetals as well as topological superconductors containing Majorana fermions. In this talk I will give a brief review of these developments and discuss an intriguing connection noticed recently by Kitaev between one such topological system – the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model – and the horizon of a black hole.

Renormalization group analysis of phase transitions in the two dimensional Majorana-Hubbard model

Speaker: 
Kyle Wamer
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2018-08-21 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Ian Affleck

A lattice of interacting Majorana modes can occur in a superconducting film on a topological insulator in a magnetic field. The phase diagram as a function of interaction strength for the square lattice was analyzed recently using a combination of mean field theory and field theory and was found to include second order phase transitions. One of these corresponds to sponta- neous breaking of an emergent U(1) symmetry, for attractive interactions.

Fingerprints of spin-orbital polarons in the photoemission spectra of the vanadium perovskites

Speaker: 
Andrzej M. Oles from the Jagiellonian University, Krakow and the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-07-26 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Mona Berciu

We explore the effects of disordered charged defects on the electronic excitations observed in the photoemission spectra of doped transition metal oxides in the Mott insulating regime by the example of the R1−xCaxVO3 perovskites, where R= La, ⋯, Lu. A fundamental characteristic of these vanadium

High pressure floating zone crystal growth of strongly correlated materials

Speaker: 
Junjie Zhang, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-07-09 11:30 - 12:30
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Doug Bonn

Among various techniques available for making single crystals, optical image floating zone crystal growth has been recognized as a leading tool for the production of ultrahigh-purity single crystals. High pressure of gas provides an additional advantage to the floating zone crystal growth in twofold: (1) it can suppress the evaporation of volatile components, and (2) it can generate high activity of reactive gas, such as oxygen, to stabilize high-valence oxidation states. In this talk, I will present successful crystal growth of several high-valence nickelates and cobaltites.

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