Condensed Matter Seminars

Renormalization group analysis of phase transitions in the two dimensional Majorana-Hubbard model

Speaker: 
Kyle Wamer
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2018-08-21 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Ian Affleck

A lattice of interacting Majorana modes can occur in a superconducting film on a topological insulator in a magnetic field. The phase diagram as a function of interaction strength for the square lattice was analyzed recently using a combination of mean field theory and field theory and was found to include second order phase transitions. One of these corresponds to sponta- neous breaking of an emergent U(1) symmetry, for attractive interactions.

Fingerprints of spin-orbital polarons in the photoemission spectra of the vanadium perovskites

Speaker: 
Andrzej M. Oles from the Jagiellonian University, Krakow and the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-07-26 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Mona Berciu

We explore the effects of disordered charged defects on the electronic excitations observed in the photoemission spectra of doped transition metal oxides in the Mott insulating regime by the example of the R1−xCaxVO3 perovskites, where R= La, ⋯, Lu. A fundamental characteristic of these vanadium

High pressure floating zone crystal growth of strongly correlated materials

Speaker: 
Junjie Zhang, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-07-09 11:30 - 12:30
Location: 
AMPEL #311
Local Contact: 
Doug Bonn

Among various techniques available for making single crystals, optical image floating zone crystal growth has been recognized as a leading tool for the production of ultrahigh-purity single crystals. High pressure of gas provides an additional advantage to the floating zone crystal growth in twofold: (1) it can suppress the evaporation of volatile components, and (2) it can generate high activity of reactive gas, such as oxygen, to stabilize high-valence oxidation states. In this talk, I will present successful crystal growth of several high-valence nickelates and cobaltites.

Mapping the Calogero model onto the Anyon model

Speaker: 
Stéphane Ouvry, Université Paris Sud
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-09-27 02:00 - 03:00
Location: 
AMPL 311

I will first give a review of the thermodynamics of the anyon model and the Lowest Landau Level (LLL) anyon model (i.e. anyons coupled to a
strong  external magnetic field), in  relation to that of the Calogero model and Haldane fractional statistics. Then  I will construct  explicitly an
$N$-body kernel which  maps Calogero eigenstates onto anyonic eigenstates (arXiv: 1805.09899).
 

Exploring Quantum Magnetic Fluctuations in Low Dimensional Correlated Electron Systems

Speaker: 
Bill Gannon, from the University of Northwestern
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2018-05-29 11:00 - 12:00
Location: 
AMPL 311

Quantum magnetic fluctuations are one of the key concepts in modern condensed matter physics, and is a thread that ties together a vast array of topics, from the coherence of unconventional superconductivity to the entangled disorder of quantum spin liquids to name just two examples. In this talk, I will discuss why it is essential to understand quantum magnetic fluctuations in materials that host them and how we can use inelastic neutron scattering to probe these important phenomena.

Hierarchical Nanostructures from the Self-Assembly of Functional Soft Materials

Speaker: 
Zachary M. Hudson, Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Canada
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-04-12 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

While methods for molecular synthesis are now highly advanced, the preparation of nanoscale objects of controlled size, shape and structural organization remains a key objective in the field of nanotechnology.

Controlling real and virtual photons: from quantum forces to space propulsion

Speaker: 
Jeremy N. Munday, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-04-19 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

Optoelectronic devices are used to detect and manipulate light for communications, sensing, solar power generation, etc. However, even in the dark (i.e. when no photons are present), there exist quantum fluctuations of electromagnetic fields (sometimes called virtual photons) that give rise to measurable effects. One such phenomenon is a force between two charge-neutral objects, known as the Casimir effect.

Optical tuning of electronic valleys

Speaker: 
Nuh Gedik from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-03-29 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are 2D crystalline semiconductors with unique spin-valley properties. They have a pair of valleys that, by time-reversal symmetry, are energetically degenerate. Lifting the valley degeneracy in these materials is of great interest because it would allow for valley specific band engineering. In this talk, I will show that off resonant, circularly polarized light can be used to lift the valley degeneracy by means of the optical Stark effect.

Customized low temperature measurements, studying Spin Qubits and Monopoles in Spin Ice

Speaker: 
Jan Kycia from the University of Waterloo
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-04-05 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

Non-Equilibrium dynamics in conventional and unconventional superconductors (CANCELLED)

Speaker: 
Benedikt Fauseweh, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2018-03-22 14:00 - 15:00
Location: 
AMPEL 311

Due to perosnal reasons Benedikt Fauseweh will unfortunately be unable to join us for this CM-Seminar.

We hope to be able to re-schedule a visit for him at SBQMI at a later date. Thank you for your comprehension.

 

 

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