Astronomy Colloquia

Non-linear cosmological structure formation

Speaker: 
Alex Mead (CITA National Fellow, UBC Physics & Astronomy)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-02-01 15:30 - 16:30
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Cosmological weak gravitational lensing surveys use the correlated distortions of galaxy shapes to infer properties of the matter distribution in the Universe. In principle, these measurements can then be used to constrain models of the accelerated expansion, to infer the neutrino mass, and to learn about baryonic feedback processes. However, the interpretation of weak lensing data is complicated by the fact that non-linear structure along the line-of-sight contributes to the lensing signal.

Intrinsic alignments : Theoretical and numerical insights

Speaker: 
Sandrine Codis (Canadian Institue for Theoretical Astrophysics)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-04-04 15:30 - 16:30
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
In this talk, I will show how both dark matter and hydrodynamical simulations predict that the morphology of galaxies is correlated with the cosmic web. This large-scale coherence of galaxy shapes could possibly induce some non-negligible level of contamination for future cosmic shear experiments. Direct measurements of the alignment of the projected light distribution of galaxies seem to agree on a contamination at a level of a few per cent of the shear correlation functions, although the amplitude of the effect depends on the population of galaxies considered.

Hunting for the Largest Black Holes

Speaker: 
Nicholas McConnell (Plaskett Postdoctoral Fellow, National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-03-14 15:30 - 16:30
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews and Linda Strubbe
In both the distant universe and our cosmic backyard, we find evidence for black holes as large as ~1-10 billion solar masses, dwarfing the more commonplace million-solar-mass black holes like the one at our Galactic Centre. The conventional paradigm for co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies predicts that the most massive black holes presently reside in the most luminous elliptical galaxies.

Future Large Telescopes for Canada

Speaker: 
Jason Kalirai (JSWT Project Scientist at Space Telescope Science Institute)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2015-12-28 15:30 - 16:30
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Harvey Richer
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The stars as a Sun

Speaker: 
Derek Buzasi (Florida Gulf Coast University)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-03-07 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
The star we know best is the one which is closest to us, and astronomers therefore tend to rely heavily on the Sun as a proxy for stars in general. One approach to improving our knowledge of the Sun is through the study of solar analogs, stars which are similar to our own in as many ways as we can quantify.

The GrayStar project: Moving computational stellar astrophysics into the Web browser

Speaker: 
Ian Short (St. Mary's University, Institute for Computational Astrophysics)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-01-11 15:30 - 16:15
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The goal of the GrayStar project is to turn any WWW browser running on any device into a didactic “teaching and
learning” virtual star equipped with user-friendly input parameter knobs and instrumented with virtual observables
and more advanced modeling outputs, so that stellar astronomy instructors can use physics education research (PER)
methods in class. No special technical specifications are required of the user's device, nor any special computational
savviness on the part of the user. GrayStar3 is a physics-based general stellar atmosphere and spectral line modeling

AGN feedback in Clusters of Galaxies

Speaker: 
Julie Hlavacek-Larrondo (Universite de Montreal)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-02-22 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
The last few decades have shown us that radio jets originating from supermassive black holes can interact strongly with their surrounding medium. During this talk, I will review the current status of this field, known as AGN feedback, while focusing on the most massive black holes in the Universe, those that lie at the centers of galaxy clusters. I will review the physics behind these interactions and then focus on the evolution of radio feedback over cosmic time while presenting new results from clusters discovered via the South Pole Telescope.

The Chemistry of Planet Formation

Speaker: 
Karin Oberg (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-01-18 15:30 - 16:30
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Planets form from dust and gas in disks around young stars. The chemical composition and structures of these disks regulate planet formation efficiencies, bulk planet compositions (including their C/O ratio), and the volatile and organic content of nascent planets. Understanding disk chemical structures and inventories is therefore key to constrain planet formation and planet habitability. In the age of ALMA we can observe this chemistry on Solar System scales and the results are spectacular.

Supermassive Black Holes in Galaxy Nuclei:Coevolution (Or Not) Of Black Holes And Host Galaxies

Speaker: 
John Kormendy (University of Texas at Austin)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2015-11-09 15:30 - 16:30
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews, Mark Halpern
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Supermassive black holes (BHs) with masses of ~ 10**6 to 10**9 Solar masses are believed to live at the centers of most large galaxies. I review the observed demographics and inferred evolution of BHs found by spatially resolved kinematic measurements. Tight correlations between BH mass and the mass and velocity dispersion of the host-galaxy bulge have led to the belief that BHs and bulges co-evolve by regulating each other's growth. New results replace this simple story with a richer and more plausible picture in which BHs correlate differently with different galaxy components.

The Nonconservative Action Principle: Basic Formalism and Numerical Applications

Speaker: 
Dave Tsang
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2015-08-24 15:30 - 16:30
Location: 
TBA (Likely Hennings 318)
I will outline the nonconservative variational principle that we
have recently developed, which allows for nonconservative processes to be generically modeled with an action.
Syndicate content
Website development by Checkmark Media. Designed by Armada.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Faculty of Science
Department of Physics and Astronomy
6224 Agricultural Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
Tel 604.822.3853
Fax 604.822.5324

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia