Astronomy Colloquia

THANKSGIVING DAY HOLIDAY

Speaker: 
NO ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIUM TODAY
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-10-10 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

CANCELLED: The first massive black holes

Speaker: 
Marta Volonteri (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-10-31 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Unfortunately, Dr. Volonteri has taken ill and her doctor has advised that she cannot travel for at least ten days.

PUBLIC VIEWING OF THE TRANSIT OF MERCURY

Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-05-09 09:00 - 11:10
Location: 
Plaza in front of Koerner Library, UBC
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews and Jeremy Heyl
Intended Audience: 
Public
The planet Mercury will transit (pass in front of the face of the Sun) for the first time in a decade on Monday morning, 9 May. The UBC Department of Physics & Astronomy, with the support of the UBC Astronomy Club, will host safe public viewing of the transit during 9:00 - 11:40 a.m. on Monday.

Stellar streams and fundamental physics

Speaker: 
Jo Bovy (University of Toronto)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-10-03 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Stellar tidal streams originating from disrupting globular clusters in the Milky Way’s halo hold enormous promise as probes of both the large-scale structure of the Milky Way halo’s density distribution and its small-scale structure. As such, the observed density, spatial, and kinematic structure of stellar streams can provide important new constraints on the interactions and small-scale structure of dark matter. I will discuss the simple gravitational dynamics of tidal-stream formation and evolution and how we can use it to build simple and fast models for tidal streams.

From pebbles to planets

Speaker: 
Katherine Kretke (Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-11-28 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
In recent years there has been a radical shift in the thinking about small-body and planet formation. Particles with stopping times comparable to their orbital times, often called "pebbles" (although they may range from sub-centimeter to almost meters in size), interact with gaseous protoplanetary disks in very special ways.

The Milky Way Galaxy: Inferring the dark matter from the light

Speaker: 
Gwendolyn Eadie (McMaster University)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-09-12 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Although there is consensus that the Galaxy's mass is dominated by its dark matter halo, the exact value of its mass is poorly constrained. The underlying reason for this is that there are serious challenges associated with using the motions of tracer particles like globular clusters or halo stars to deduce the mass profile; the 3D velocity measurements are often incomplete and uncertain, and there are only a few GCs at large distances from the Galactic center.

The Hubble constant in the era of precision cosmology

Speaker: 
Lucas Macri (Texas A&M University)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-09-26 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
Having settled the decades-long bitter debate over the value of the Hubble constant, research on the Extragalactic Distance Scale has seen a remarkable transformation over the past decade. The focus is now on a proper accounting of all sources of uncertainty (specially systematics) and the development of new techniques to further increase the accuracy and precision in the measurement of H_0 . What is the motivation for further work on the Hubble constant?

Modeling gas–dust interactions in debris disks

Speaker: 
Alex Richert (Penn State University)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-04-11 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Aaron Boley and Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
The discovery of debris disks with gas has raised the question of whether gas–dust interactions shape global disk structure, which has implications for the detectability of embedded planets, as well as the distribution of volatiles in young planetary systems. Observed dust-to-gas ratios of order unity in some debris disks suggest that the dust, unlike in protoplanetary disks, is hydrodynamically important, yet this regime remains largely unexplored in the literature.

EASTER MONDAY - UBC CLOSED - NO ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIUM

Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-03-28 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Not Hennings 318 (or anywhere, for that matter).

UBC STUDY BREAK (a.k.a. Reading Week) - No Astronomy Colloquium today

Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2016-02-15 15:30 - 16:45
Location: 
Not Hennings 318 (or anywhere, for that matter).
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