Astronomy Colloquia

REMEMBRANCE DAY OBSERVANCE - No Astronomy Colloquium today

Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-11-12 15:00 - 16:15
Location: 
Where you choose to observe

A machine-learning view of our Milky Way

Speaker: 
Nina Hernitschek (Caltech)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-11-05 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Every night, telescopes around the world obtain a flood of new data as parts of deep and wide surveys. This amount of data will steeply rise once upcoming sureys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will image the entire visible sky every few nights, start their operation. To investigate this huge amount of data, machine-learning algorithms are absolutely necessary for image analysis, classification of sources, time-series analysis and also structure finding.

To be announced

Speaker: 
Marcel Pawlowski (UC Irvine)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-10-29 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

To be announced

Speaker: 
Jessie Christiansen (Caltech, NASA Exoplanet Science Institute)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-10-22 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY - No Astronomy Colloquium today

Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-10-08 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Stay home if you can

To be announced

Speaker: 
Holger Baumgardt (University of Queensland)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-10-01 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Harvey Richer
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Internal kinematics of globular clusters

Speaker: 
Andrea Bellini (Space Telescope Science Institute)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-09-24 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Hervey Richer
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

With the advent of the Gaia mission, astrometry is experiencing a renaissance. Although Gaia will make important breakthroughs in many different areas, stars in the crowded central fields of globular clusters and at the faint end of the color-magnitude diagram are out of Gaia's reach. However, the stable environment of space makes the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) an excellent astrometric tool.  Its diffraction-limited resolution allows it to distinguish and measure positions and brightnesses for faint stars all the way to the center of most globular clusters.

Probing planetary interior structure and processes with high-precision rotation measurements

Speaker: 
Jean-Luc Margot (Dept. Earth, Planetary & Space Sciences Dept. Physics & Astronomy, UCLA)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-09-17 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Brett Gladman
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Profound developments in our understanding of the Earth, Moon, and other planetary bodies have been enabled by rotation studies.  I will describe the application of a new Earth-based radar technique that enables high-precision measurements of planetary spin states and provides powerful probes of planetary interior structure and processes.

Cosmology with the cosmic microwave background light: then and now

Speaker: 
Francois Bouchet (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-09-10 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Douglas Scott
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Cosmology enjoyed a remarkable development over the last century. Astronomical observations revealed that galaxies like our own are not distributed at random throughout space, but rather delineate a quite remarkable structure, reminiscent of the skeletal framework of a sponge. How could that be? We now have developed a compelling picture of how these galaxies and their distribution developed over time, under the influence of gravity. We trace their origin to the earliest moment of the Universe.

The Rise and Fall of Galaxies

Speaker: 
Evan Scannapieco (Arizona State University)
Event Date and Time: 
Mon, 2018-03-05 15:00 - 16:15
Location: 
Hennings 318
Local Contact: 
Jaymie Matthews
Intended Audience: 
Graduate
The golden age of galaxies has come and gone. From an initial distribution of weak density perturbations, gravity acted bring forth ever-larger structures, overcoming a range of feedback processes to efficiently form stars and galaxies at an exponentially increasing rate. Then just as quickly as it arose, the epoch of efficient galaxy formation faded away, the cosmic star formation rate declining by 90% to its current day value. I will discuss our efforts to understand the processes that shaped this dramatic evolution.
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