AMO Seminars

Using Lasers to Rotate Molecules

Speaker: 
Dr. Ilya Sh. Averbukh, Weizmann Institute of Science
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2013-04-05 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Valery Milner
Intended Audience: 
Undergraduate

Dr. Averbukh will briefly overview some recent developments in the field of laser control of molecular rotation, including selective spinning of molecular isotopes and nuclear spin isomers, and control of the sense of molecular rotation by short laser pulses. He will also present the recent proposal on observing quantum resonances and quantum chaotic phenomena (including Anderson localization) in the rotation of laser-kicked molecules, and will discuss the results of the first experiments done at UBC. Finally, Dr.

A local realistic reconciliation of the EPR paradox

Speaker: 
Bryan C. Sanctuary, McGill
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2013-05-03 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Roman Krems
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

TBA

Spectra of doped Helium Nanodroplets, helium clusters, and hydrogen clusters: Structure and Dynamics of Quantum-Solvated Systems

Speaker: 
Wolfgang Jaeger, U of Alberta
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-03-21 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Ed Grant
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

TBA

Anapole moment measurement in francium laser cooled atoms

Speaker: 
Eduardo Gomez, FrPNC collaboration
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2013-04-12 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
John Behr
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The weak interaction between nucleons induces a multipole moment called the anapole moment. It can be measured in parity forbidden transitions that become allowed due to the anapole moment. In the FrPNC collaboration we have a program to measure it in laser cooled francium atoms by driving electric dipole (E1) transitions between hyperfine levels. I will describe the method to be used and the progress we have made in the collaboration so far.

Molecular Dynamics: From Attosecond Physics to Biophotonics

Speaker: 
Albert Stolow (NRC)
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2013-01-17 17:00 - 18:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Ed Grant
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

TBA

High Brightness Extreme Ultraviolet Frequency Combs via Intracavity High-Order Harmonic Generation

Speaker: 
Tom Allison
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2012-11-27 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henning 318
Local Contact: 
D. Jones
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

A coherent XUV and soft x-ray light source can be realized through high-order harmonic generation (HHG). HHG transfers the spatial and temporal coherence of laser light to the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and is now being used for many exciting applications. This is typically realized with low repetition rate (< 100 kHz) amplified femtosecond laser systems producing high-energy pulses (>100 μJ), with average powers up to tens of Watts.

Vibrational Spectroscopy of Water Interfaces

Speaker: 
Prof. Yuen-Ron Shen
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-10-19 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Keng Chou
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Water interfaces play key roles in many disciplines. Understanding of their structures and properties at the molecular level is however still lacking, but is likely with recent development of Infrared-visible sum-frequency spectroscopy (SFS). Being highly surface-specific, SFS is the only technique that can yield vibrational spectra for water interfaces, thus providing their structural information. It can also be used to probe ultrafast interfacial water dynamics.

Femtosecond frequency combs: precision spectroscopy from the UV to the XUV

Speaker: 
R. Jason Jones
Event Date and Time: 
Thu, 2012-10-04 16:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Henn 318
Local Contact: 
David Jones
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

The fs frequency comb has proven to be a powerful tool in both precision spectroscopy and ultrafast science. By providing a direct phase-coherent link between optical and microwave frequencies it has dramatically simplified the precision measurement of optical transitions while simultaneously enabling access to sub-cycle control and synchronization of optical fields. It’s use has thus far been limited to wavelengths in the deep-UV or longer (>200 nm).

Polar Radical Sources for Quantum Simulation: Moving Trap Zeeman Deceleration and Photostop

Speaker: 
Dr. David Carty (Durham University)
Event Date and Time: 
Fri, 2012-09-14 16:00 - 17:30
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Taka Momose
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

In a remarkable paper from 2006, Peter Zoller (Micheli et al., Nat. Phys, 2, 341) showed that polar radicals arranged in optical lattices can be used to systematically engineer many-body Hamiltonians of spin lattice models that can used to understand the properties of exotic materials. In this talk, which will consist of two main parts, I will present the current status of two experiments situated in Durham designed to produce trapped cold polar radicals that can be further cooled to microKelvin temperatures by sympathetic cooling with laser cooled atoms in a microwave trap.

 

Cold Chemistry: Scattering Experiments Involving Slow, Guided and Trapped Atoms and Molecules

Speaker: 
Prof. Frank Stienkemeier
Event Date and Time: 
Tue, 2012-09-18 16:30 - 17:30
Location: 
Chem D-215
Local Contact: 
Takamasa Momose
Intended Audience: 
Graduate

Cold reactive collisions of atoms and molecules have recently gained quite some attention to understand the quantum dynamics and e.g. the role of tunneling and scattering resonances. The reaction Li + HF → LiF + H represents an ideal prototype system for developing methods to calculate reliable ab-initio potential energy surfaces and to calculate quantum scattering phenomena.

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